En 2014, le Tribunal canadien des droits de la personne a clos ses audiences dans une affaire de droits de la personne qui fera jurisprudence et qui risque d'avoir d'importantes répercussions à  long terme sur le financement des programmes et services dans les réserves, y compris dans les domaines de la santé et de l’éducation.

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Rapport annuel 2014 au Parlement
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Photo du président par intérim, David Langtry

Je vous remercie de prendre le temps de lire notre rapport annuel au Parlement de 2014.

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In 2014, the CHRC released the Report on Equality Rights of Women. It provides a national portrait of how adult women are faring in Canadian society compared to adult men.

The report is based on data collected by Statistics Canada in a number of surveys conducted between 2005 and 2011. It charts well-being across seven dimensions: economic well-being; education; employment; health; housing; justice and safety; and political and social inclusion.

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Human rights law is meant to protect everyone in Canada from discrimination, but can everyone access these protections? This question is of particular concern in relation to Aboriginal people.

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The murder of a 15-year-old Aboriginal girl in Winnipeg this past summer, and the assault and near drowning of another Aboriginal teen in the same city only a few months later shocked the nation and catapulted the issue of violence against vulnerable Aboriginal women and girls into the spotlight as never before. (Read the CHRC statement on the death of Tina Fontaine.)

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In 2014, the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal concluded hearings in a landmark human rights case that could have important long-term consequences on federal government funding for on-reserve programs and services including healthcare and education.

The complaint, filed by the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society of Canada and the Assembly of First Nations, alleges that Ottawa under-funds child welfare services on reserves, depriving vulnerable and disadvantaged First Nations children of core benefits that are readily accessible in off reserve communities.

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Reconciliation with Aboriginal People is important for all

As published in the Winnipeg Free Press, March 26, 2014.

It should not surprise Manitobans to learn, as the province's auditor general and Statistics Canada each reported last week, our prisons are full to the brim and the overwhelming majority of prisoners (70 per cent) are aboriginal. Ask any Winnipegger why this is so, and you're likely to hear more frustration and finger-pointing than empathy.

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CASHRA 2014 – Accommodation does work!

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