Statistics

By law, the Commission must look at every discrimination complaint that it receives. The Commission can dismiss the complaint or refer it to an alternative dispute resolution mechanism.

When possible, the Commission encourages people to try to resolve their disputes informally and at the earliest opportunity.

In the event no agreement is reached, the Commission may conduct an investigation. When warranted, the Commission can refer it to the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal for a hearing.

In 2013, the Commission:

  • received 1,236 complaints;1
  • accepted 661 complaints;2
  • referred 380 complaints to another redress process;3
  • settled 234 complaints;
  • dismissed 196 complaints;
  • decided not to deal with 226 complaints;and
  • referred 72 complaints to the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal.
1A received complaint, also known as a potential complaint, is a contact that falls within the mandate of the CHRC, and that may lead to an accepted complaint after analysis and review.

2An accepted complaint is a document, in a form acceptable to the CHRC, that is filed by an individual or group of individuals having reasonable grounds for believing that a person or organization is engaging or has engaged in a discriminatory practice.

3This year, the number of complaints referred to another redress process includes those that were referred to the Public Service Labour Relations Board or the Public Service Staffing Tribunal before they became accepted complaints. This was not the case in previous annual reports.

4The CHRC can decide not to deal with complaints that do not meet the criteria listed under Section 41 of the Canadian Human Rights Act (e.g. the complaint fell outside of the CHRC’s jurisdiction or the complaint was frivolous, vexatious or made in bad faith.)

 

Evolution of complaints from First Nations

In 2008, Parliament amended the Canadian Human Rights Act to include matters under the Indian Act. The change was applicable immediately to complaints against the federal government. The change became applicable to complaints against First Nations governments in 2011.

In 2008, Parliament amended the Canadian Human Rights Act to include matters under the Indian Act. The change was applicable immediately to complaints against the federal government. The change became applicable to complaints against First Nations governments in 2011.

Proportion of complaints received  in 2013 by ground of discrimination

Proportion of complaints received in 2013 by ground of discrimination.

 

Figure 1 - Complaints received by province or territory

  2011 2012 2013
  # % # % # %
Ontario 889 46 717 46 566 46
British Columbia and Yukon 278 15 225 14 155 13
Quebec 231 12 174 11 145 12
Alberta, Northwest Territories and Nunavut 169 9 166 11 138 11
Nova Scotia 88 5 71 5 53 4
Manitoba 103 5 59 4 63 5
Saskatchewan 66 3 57 4 58 5
New Brunswick 41 2 61 4 42 3
Outside of Canada 4 - 1 - 0 -
Newfoundland and Labrador 38 2 19 1 10 1
Prince Edward Island 7 - 11 1 6 -
Total 1,914 100 1,561 100 1,236 100

Figure 2 - Complaints received by types of respondents

  2011 2012 2013
  # % # % # %
Private Sector 699 37 558 36 493 40
Federal government* 897 47 777 50 603 49
Reserves, Bands and Councils 138 7 138 9 93 8
Unions 71 4 50 3 25 2
Individuals 109 6 38 2 22 2
Total 1,914 100 1,561 100 1,236 100
* Includes employers in the core public administration, separate federal government organizations or agencies and Crown corporations.

 

Figure 3 - Complaints received by types of allegation cited

  2011 2012 2013
  # % # % # %
Employment-related (sections 7,8,10) 2,070 71 1,658 72 1,221 70
Services-related (sections 5,6) 435 15 390 17 321 19
Harassment – employment (section 14) 290 10 176 8 118 7
Union membership (section 9) 59 2 48 2 22 1
Retaliation (section 14.1) 36 1 32 1 22 1
Harassment – services (section 14) 33 1 7 - 17 1
Notices, signs, symbols (section 12) - - 3 - 7 -
Hate messages (section 13) 4 - - - - -
Pay equity (section 11) 2 - - - 7 -
Intimidation (section 59) - - 1 - 0 -
Total 2,929 100 2,306 100 1,735 100
* Total number of allegations cited exceeds the total number of complaints because some complaints dealt with more than one allegation.

 

Figure 4 - Complaints accepted by province or territory

  2011 2012 2013
  # % # % # %
Ontario 437 48 337 44 312 47
British Columbia and Yukon 147 16 121 16 104 16
Quebec 106 12 110 14 70 11
Alberta, Northwest Territories and Nunavut 87 10 65 9 73 11
Nova Scotia 41 5 39 5 18 3
Manitoba 34 4 33 4 25 4
Saskatchewan 19 2 23 3 30 5
New Brunswick 18 2 13 2 22 3
Outside of Canada 7 1 2 - 0 -
Newfoundland and Labrador 5 1 9 1 5 1
Prince Edward Island 2 - 8 1 2 -
Total 903 100 760 100 661 100

 

Figure 5 - Complaints accepted by types of respondents

  2011 2012 2013
  # % # % # %
Private Sector 414 46 366 48 342 52
Federal government* 315 35 254 33 239 36
Reserves, Bands and Councils 59 7 61 8 50 8
Unions 59 7 54 7 20 3
Individuals 56 6 25 3 10 2
Total 903 100 760 100 661 100
* Includes employers in the core public administration, separate federal government organizations or agencies and Crown corporations.

 

Figure 6 - Complaints accepted by types of allegation cited

  2011 2012 2013
  # % # % # %
Employment-related (sections 7,8,10) 1,055 70 926 69 741 68
Services-related (sections 5,6) 247 16 207 15 214 20
Harassment – employment (section 14) 175 12 124 9 71 7
Union membership (section 9) - - 52 4 18 2
Retaliation (section 14.1) 22 1 28 2 14 1
Harassment – services (section 14) 15 1 6 - 11 1
Notices, signs, symbols (section 12) - - 2 - 6 1
Hate messages (section 13) 1 - 1 - - -
Pay equity (section 11) - - - - 8 1
Intimidation (section 59) - - - - - -
Total 1,515 100 1,346 100 1,083 100
* Includes employers in the core public administration, separate federal government organizations or agencies and Crown corporations.

 

Figure 7 - Final decisions by type

  2011 2012 2013
Section 40/41 Analysis* 327 433 344
Dismissed 174 190 196
Settled** 244 209 234
Referred to Tribunal 129 113 72
Total 874 945 846
* Under section 40/41 of the Act, the Commission may decide not to deal with a complaint because the complainant ought to pursue another redress mechanism, the incident occurred too long ago, or because the complaint is out of jurisdiction, or considered trivial, frivolous or vexatious.

**Total number of settlements includes all settlements reached between parties, with or without help from the Commission.
35th My Canada includes everyone. | 35ième Mon Canada inclut tout le monde.