Infographics

This infographic is an overview of some of the key findings of a 2020 survey conducted by the Canadian Human Rights Commission, asking people to weigh in on the Commission’s new role in monitoring the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. 

Monitoring the CRPD - Preliminary survey results 

Infographic 1 - Monitoring the CRPD

Here is what the infographic tells you:

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) is an international agreement that promotes and protects human rights for people with disabilities. The Canadian Human Rights Commission is responsible for monitoring how the CRPD is being followed in Canada.

In June and July 2020, the Commission asked people across Canada about how they want to be involved in this important work, and what THEY think is important.

We received 2927 responses. Of those, 64% identified as having a disability, and 48% are familiar with the CRPD.

One of the questions we asked was: How much of a positive effect do you think the Convention will have for people with disabilities? 54% said they think the CRPD will have a positive effect. 

We asked about Canada’s performance in protecting and promoting the rights of people with disabilities. The scores were not in Canada’s favour. 86% of respondents feel Canada is doing a poor job promoting the rights of people with disabilities. And 83% feel Canada is doing a poor job protecting the rights of people with disabilities.

In asking respondents what the top 3 issues or areas of concern are for them, they identified: 

  • Poverty
  • Housing
  • Work and Employment

Infographic 2 - Monitoring the CRPD

Here is what the infographic tells you:

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) is an international agreement that promotes and protects human rights for people with disabilities. The Canadian Human Rights Commission is responsible for monitoring how the CRPD is being followed in Canada.

In June and July 2020, the Commission asked people across Canada about how they want to be involved in this important work, and what THEY think is important.

66% of respondents said they are interested in being involved in the Commission’s monitoring work.

We asked respondents about the kinds of supports they would need to be able to take part in monitoring: The top 3 supports identified were:

  • Training
  • Financial resources
  • Communication supports

We asked them what roles they could see themselves playing. The top 3 roles identified were:

  • Staying informed and up to date on the monitoring process
  • Review drafts of final reports
  • Review data that is gathered

We asked what would be some of the most useful outputs of information. The top 3 outputs identified were:

  • Stories about people with disabilities
  • Visual information – like videos or brochures
  • Reports